lse público
[search 0]
Más

Download the App!

show episodes
 
The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is one of the foremost social science universities in the world. LSE is a specialist university with an international intake and a global reach. Its research and teaching span the full breadth of the social sciences, from economics, politics and law to sociology, anthropology, accounting and finance. Founded in 1895 by Beatrice and Sidney Webb, the School has an outstanding reputation for academic excellence. LSE has 16 Nobel prize w ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
In this bonus episode, recorded in front of a live virtual audience, Professor Paul Dolan and his guests discuss the neuroscience and social science behind the polarisation problem. Why do we take sides on so many issues? What makes us want to be part of one group and not another? What drives our judgements, choices and assumptions?Paul was joined …
 
This webinar, co-organised with the Society for Algerian Studies, was a launch for Dr. Natalya Vince's latest book 'The Algerian War, The Algerian Revolution'.This book provides a new analysis of the contested history of one of the most violent wars of decolonisation of the twentieth century – the Algerian War/the Algerian Revolution between 1954 a…
 
In this episode, Professor Paul Dolan examines what the last year has taught us about life’s only certainty: death. Has it changed how we think about the lives of older and younger people? Do we want to live longer, or better? He speaks to two people with different views: Brendan McCarthy works who for the Church of England, and the cancer speciali…
 
Conspiracy theories fomented by political division and a global pandemic have gained traction in the public consciousness in the last couple of years. For some people these ideas are just fun and entertaining, but for others their interest in them becomes much more consuming. Why do people become involved in this kind of conspiratorial thinking? Th…
 
In this episode, Professor Paul Dolan looks at gender differences. He talks to the men’s rights activist, Erin Pizzey, about why she thinks life is tougher for men and boys, especially at school. He’s also joined by Caroline Criado Perez, author of “Invisible Women”, about how the world is built by men for men. Paul hears from fellow LSE academic D…
 
This webinar, as part of the LSE Middle East Centre's Kurdish Studies Series, was a discussion around the new and revised edition of David McDowall's book 'A Modern History of the Kurds'.In this latest edition, McDowall analyses the momentous transformations affecting Kurdish socio-politics in the last 20 years. This fourth edition includes new ana…
 
Instant Coffee is back! And on season 2, we’re exploring our favourite topic, food. We are going beyond the plate to understand how the complexities of food, farming and cuisine in the region are shaping people’s writing, thinking and organising. We’ll be speaking with inspiring individuals who are grappling with culinary appropriation, access to f…
 
Taylor C. Sherman discusses her forthcoming book, reassessing the Nehru years in Indian history. Here she focuses on Indian socialism as it developed during Jawaharlal Nehru's premiership, and explains how it was shaped by the experience of colonialism and the national movement.Nehru's India: Seven Myths is due out with Princeton University Press i…
 
This webinar, co-organised with Boston University School of Law's International Human Rights Clinic, explored research outputs from their project on the challenges of statelessness in the region. To find out more about the project click here: https://www.bu.edu/law/current-students/jd-student-resources/experiential-learning/clinics/international-hu…
 
This event was a book launch for 'Civilization and the Making of the State in Lebanon and Syria' by Dr. Andrew Delatolla.The book argues that the modern state, from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period, has consistently been used as a means to measure civilizational engagement and attainment. This volume historicizes this dynamic, exam…
 
To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod http://subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk/assets/richmedia/webFeeds/lseiqpodcast_iTunesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iqWelcome to LSE's award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists - and other exp…
 
The PowerPoint presentations from the event can be viewed here: https://www.lse.ac.uk/middle-east-centre/events/2021/kuwaits-urbanisation This Kuwait Programme event was a discussion about two research projects - 'Public Space in Kuwait: From User Behaviour to Policy-making' led by Alexandra Gomes and Asseel Al-Ragam, and 'Towards an Equitable Tran…
 
This webinar was the launch of Omar Sirri's paper 'Destructive Creations: Social-Spatial Transformations in Contemporary Baghdad' published as part of the LSE Middle East Centre Paper Series.This working paper examines social-spatial transformations in contemporary Baghdad by zooming in on two of the city’s most frequented consumer districts, Karad…
 
On 15 February 2021, The US Centre’s Chris Gilson spoke to Professor Robert Lieberman and Professor Suzanne Mettler about their recent book, ‘Four Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy’. In this podcast, they discuss some of the unique features of American democracy and how its four pillars may be under threat, and what needs to be do…
 
This event was a book launch for 'Israeli Foreign Policy Since the End of the Cold War' by Dr. Amnon Aran. This is the first study of Israeli foreign policy towards the Middle East and selected world powers including China, India, the European Union and the United States since the end of the Cold War. It provides an integrated account of these fore…
 
Computer algorithms shape our lives and increasingly control our future. They have crept into virtually every aspect of modern life and are making life-changing choices on our behalf, often without us realising. But how much power should we give to them and have we let things go too far? Joanna Bale talks to Ken Benoit, Andrew Murray, Seeta Peña Ga…
 
Professor Paul Dolan examines whether class is fundamental to how people see themselves and whether we want a classless society. He speaks to two people who come from very different backgrounds. Lily Russell-Stracey went to an exclusive boarding school and a top university – and is now a plumber in Glasgow. Dr Wanda Wyporska comes from a working-cl…
 
Professor Paul Dolan looks at how we have becoming increasingly polarised in what we do to our bodies. Some of us getting fitter whilst most are getting fatter. The polarisation extends from our own behaviour to the judgements we make. We celebrate the fit and chastise the fat.Paul speaks to two very different people to find out how they live their…
 
Professor Paul Dolan asks if it’s ok to cancel someone for something they say or post on social media. Should freedom of speech and expression be protected at all costs – and how do we balance it with protection from bullying and hate? He speaks to two people with different opinions. Matthew Syed is a writer and journalist. He is a staunch defender…
 
Marriage and monogamy: Are single women happier? Professor Paul Dolan looks at relationships and the judgements people make, specifically when it comes to women. Why do people have such strong views on how women choose to live their lives? Why is marriage and monogamy still seen as the ultimate fairy tale? Paul speaks to two women who have made ver…
 
Professor Paul Dolan asks if more security means less freedom? Has the pandemic fundamentally changed our relationship with the state and what it can tell us to do? He speaks to two people with very different views on these questions. Steve Baker is the Conservative MP for Wycombe and Deputy Chair of the Covid Recovery Group B, and Graham Medley is…
 
This event was co-organised with the Kurdish Studies Programme at the University of Central Florida. It was the book launch of 'Kurds and Yezidis in the Middle East: Shifting Identities, Borders, and the Experience of Minority Communities'. The diversity of Kurdish communities across the Middle East is now recognized as central to understanding bot…
 
This event was the launch of the publication 'Redefining deprivation in a conflict area: learning from the Palestinian experience using mixed methods' produced as part of the Academic Collaboration with Arab Universities Programme, led by Principal Investigators Tiziana Leone, Rita Giacaman and Weeam Hammoudeh.Conflicts threaten public health, huma…
 
In this episode of The Politics of Race in American Film, Dr. Clive James Nwonka hosts a conversation with Cheryl Bedford (Women of Color Unite), Lanre Bakare (The Guardian), and Sam Mejias (The New School) which looks at films which engage with questions of blackness and race in America during the Obama and Trump eras. These films include Moonligh…
 
In this episode of The Politics of Race in American Film, Dr. Clive James Nwonka hosts a conversation with Melanie Hoyes (British Film Institute), Dr. Luisa Heredia (Sarah Lawrence College), and Dr. Shelley Cobb (University of Southampton) about the films American Honey and The Florida Project. Each film examines the experiences of people on the fr…
 
To mark International Women’s Day 2021, we explore how India can adopt more gender inclusive policy planning and implementation to manage the impact of COVID-19. Meet our speakers and chairFarzana Afridi is Lead Academic for IGC India and an Associate Professor in the Economics and Planning Unit at the Indian Statistical Institute in Delhi. Her are…
 
When it comes to work, is less more? Our panel discuss whether work is making us bad citizens and unhappy humans. Is there something to be said for being idle? Bertrand Russell wrote that "immense harm is caused by the belief that work is virtuous". In more recent times, organisations from Microsoft to the Wellcome Trust have experimented with a fo…
 
During the presidency of Donald Trump, the US pursued a more self-interested and transactional foreign policy, often seeing relations with other countries as a zero-sum game. Charles Kupchan discusses his new book, Isolationism: A History of America’s Efforts to Shield Itself from the World. He looks at how the resurgence of isolationism is reshapi…
 
This Kuwait Programme event was a discussion about Dr Zeynep Kaya’s recent research on women's political participation in Kuwait. Dr Lubna Al-Kazi acted as a discussant, and Dr Courtney Freer chaired the event.Since the introduction of women’s suffrage in 2005, the number of women elected to parliament in Kuwait has been very small. Despite this, t…
 
Rethinking inequality reduction programmes in post-COVID Latin America is timely and urgent. What are the pathways forward?After a decade or more in which inequality had fallen in Latin America, in recent years inequality had risen once more, motivating waves of protests across the region. COVID-19 has exploited existing inequalities affecting both…
 
How can policy makers and urban health leaders plan through this uncertainty, and how can those plans help to address the changing nature of and existing inequalities in urban health?To explore this question, we focus on a scenario planning approach undertaken by the Guys’ and St Thomas’ Charity and LSE Cities. Developed using a combination of soci…
 
We explore political polarisation in the UK, EU, US and on social media in light of COVID-19, and how democracy can be built back.When the COVID-19 pandemic hit and the world was plunged into lockdown, nations were unified in the fight against the virus. As time has rolled on, a suffering economy, rising infection and death rates, a historic electi…
 
In this episode of The Politics of Race in American Film podcast, Dr. Clive James Nwonka discusses the films Paterson and The Last Black Man in San Francisco with Dr. Suzanne Hall (LSE Sociology) and Dr. Austin Zeiderman (LSE Geography and the Environment). Both films examine the relationships their main characters have with the cities in which the…
 
Effective leadership is essential in any organisation. In an uncertain world, resilient leaders are more important than ever to the survival and success of a business.In this session, Dr Rebecca Newton, Professor Sandy Pepper and Dr Emma Soane will discuss how you can use the dynamics of authentic and transformational leadership to change organisat…
 
Almost overnight, following lockdown, children’s lives became digital by default. We critically reflect on how children’s experiences, needs and rights are being, and could be better, served in a digital world. COVID-19 transformed society’s reliance on digital technologies as the infrastructure for work, family, education, health and more. Suppose…
 
Our panel address the legacy of colonialism within international health systems and ask: what is the relationship between histories of imperialism and health, development and human rights? How can international institutions be reformed to overturn the global North’s dominance in health programming? How might new funding arrangements that empower gl…
 
Women’s vulnerability must be considered in pandemic preparedness and response. We look at the role of UK policymakers in re-establishing the path to a more equal society for men and women in this context and draw comparisons with other countries who are doing well, and who have also fallen shy of the mark. While there have been significant advance…
 
Although the distinctive outcomes of COVID-19 in Southeast Asia are only now becoming clear, we expect that they can become the basis for innovative and impactful ideas that will matter for neighbouring regions and the world. Leading thinkers on Southeast Asia reflect on the lessons of COVID-19 for connectivity, governance, and urbanisation in the …
 
How can we combine recovery from COVID-19 with the shift to an inclusive and sustainable global economy? Leading figures in government, business and civil society have pledged to “build back better”. In the run-up to the COP26 climate summit in November 2021, there’s a clear need for both greater ambition and greater practicality in mobilising the …
 
What should a social contract for the 21st century look like? Launching her new book, What We Owe Each Other, LSE Director Minouche Shafik draws on evidence from across the globe to identify key principles for a social contract for every society. She will be in conversation with Juan Manuel Santos and Amartya Sen. The social contract governs all as…
 
Can the massive shift in the way we now relate to each other, and the rules we choose to live by, help us tackle other collective threats to humanity, like climate change? We need coordinated and cooperative collective action. Experts in behavioural public policy and sustainability discuss how the experience of the pandemic can be leveraged to enab…
 
This webinar was co-organised with the Society for Algerian Studies.Sino-Algerian relations date back to the Afro-Asian Bandung conference in 1955. China’s status as first non-Arab country to recognise Algeria’s pre-independence provisional government in 1958, coupled with Algiers’ support in helping China restore its security council seat at the U…
 
To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk…unesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iqWelcome to LSE's award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer an intelligent question about e…
 
In the second of two episodes on the ‘localisation agenda’, this episode examines the barriers to the localisation of aid in South Sudan, including the assumptions made by donors and international agencies about South Sudanese NGOs. It explores how South Sudanese NGOs deal with security risks and how they secure funding to carry out their activitie…
 
In the first of two episodes on the ‘localisation agenda’ in humanitarianism and international development, we explore commitments made at the World Humanitarian Summit in 2016 towards localisation, and the progress made on these commitments in South Sudan. The episode looks into the histories of NGOs in the country, the challenges faced by NGO fou…
 
This webinar launched the book 'Open Gaza: Architectures of Hope' edited by Deen Sharp and the late Michael Sorkin.The Gaza Strip is one of the most beleaguered environments on earth. Crammed into a space of 139 square miles (360 square kilometers), 1.8 million people live under an Israeli siege, enforcing conditions that continue to plummet to eve…
 
GCC countries share their national wealth with citizens through public employment and subsidies, policies that are inefficient, inequitable, economically distortive and fiscally unsustainable. This talk discusses how unconditional cash grants for adult nationals could replace government jobs and subsidies, drawing on Dr Steffen Hertog’s recent rese…
 
Loading …

Guia de referencia rapida

Google login Twitter login Classic login