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Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here: theguardian.com/covid19questions
 
Exploring the coolest and most incredible stuff in science, from way back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth to a future where humans live in space! Fun Kids Science Weekly is hosted by Dan and is the perfect science podcast for kids and families everywhere. Each week, you'll find episodes from series like Deep Space High, Age of the Dinosaurs and Professor Hallux. There's also a special guest, top experts answering all your science questions and Dangerous Dan - something scientific that’s also ...
 
Signup to the newsletter: http://firescienceshow.com Fire Science Show is connecting fire researchers and practitioners with a society of fire engineers, firefighters, architects, designers and all others, who are genuinely interested in creating a fire-safe future. Through interviews with a diverse group of experts, we present the history of our field as well as the most novel advancements. We hope the Fire Science Show becomes your weekly source of fire science knowledge and entertainment.
 
Science writer Ned Rozell has accompanied researchers all over Alaska and given firsthand accounts of discoveries, triumphs and pitfalls of field work conducted in the Last Frontier. Through in-depth conversations, Ned gives voice to research stories ranging from volcanoes, earthquakes and auroras to climate change, anthropology, paleontology and wildfires. Any natural phenomena in Alaska and the people who study them are fair game. Ned has spent more than 25 years writing hundreds of scienc ...
 
Quirky, entertaining and informative, the weekly Science Update Podcast bundles five of Science Update’s award-winning 60-second radio shows together with insightful commentary from one of our producers. Since 1988, Science Update has covered the latest discoveries in science, technology, and medicine and has answered listeners’ science questions. Phone your question in to our toll-free answer line, 1-800-WHY-ISIT (949-4748) or submit it via our website, scienceupdate.com. Science Update is ...
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine and his column, "Antigravity", is one of science writing's rate venues for humor. Check our the new daily podcast from Scientific American: "60-Second Science." To view all of our ...
 
A weekly podcast in which creative professionals G.M.B Chomichuk and Justin Currie (Chasing Artwork) explore the ingredients that go into a life working in their studio making art, writing stories and making graphic novels. Interviews with other industry newcomers and professionals compare and contrast different approaches and philosophies of living a creative life. https://www.patreon.com/gmbchomichuk
 
Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World web ...
 
This podcast, starring host Dr Rob Doubleday, features weekly evidence-based discussions about the pressing challenges facing policymakers, brought to you by the Centre for Science and Policy at the University of Cambridge. Throughout 2020-2021, our podcast has featured series which have explored topics including science and policy for space, antarctica and deep ocean environments; the covid-19 pandemic; the science and policy questions involved in getting a green recovery; and the future of ...
 
Anna Kavanaugh hosts the weekly radio series, "Mad Science: The Genetic Crossroad." The program aims to raise awareness and provide education about genetically modified organisms (GMO), in the world food supply and the practices of the GM biotech industry. The series is dedicated to all issues surrounding GM foods, its usage and ramifications thereof.Anna is a writer, advocate, and founder of the (AKCF) Anna Kavanaugh Charitable Foundation. Her original novel, "The Cord of Callows," now an u ...
 
Urban Nerd Weekly is a podcast dedicated to all things nerdy, strange, and specific. Each Friday host (Comedian/Writer) "$pay¢e" and co-host (Meme Troll/Writer)"Kitty", dives into the biggest news in science, art, entertainment, and pop culture. Be sure to subscribe so you can get each episode while its fresh. Comment so we can know what you guys wanna hear.
 
Aaron Singerman hosts Readiness Radio and discusses sacrifices and professionalism as it relates to business. He and his guests share personal past experiences that exemplify the necessary skills and tips needed to better themselves in those areas. You will undoubtedly gain some knowledge to better yourself for future endeavors. Enjoy episodes just like this weekly and soon daily on RedCon1.com.
 
Johns Hopkins Medicine is pleased to present its health and medicine podcast, a lively discussion of the week’s medical news and how it may affect you. This five to seven-minute free program features Elizabeth Tracey, director of electronic media for Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Rick Lange M.D., professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins and vice chairman of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
 
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Cool News Timestamps: Single drop of dried blood can reveal athlete doping | Futurity (01:39) Acoustic Tweezers Can Pick Objects Up With Sound Waves – Without Any Physical Contact | SciTechDaily (07:50) Masten Space Systems to develop a GPS-like network for the moon | TechCrunch (12:32) Hubble Finds First Evidence of Water Vapor on Jupiter's Larges…
 
Genetic advantages in sport tend to be celebrated, but that isn’t always the case when it comes to women’s athletics. At the start of July, two female runners from Namibia, Christine Mboma and Beatrice Masilingi, were told they couldn’t compete in the 400m race in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics unless they reduced their naturally high testosterone hormone…
 
It’s estimated that anywhere from 10%-30% of females on the spectrum also suffer from an eating disorder, and that autistic traits are high (even without a diagnosis of ASD) in those with eating disorders. There is clearly crossover in the underlying biology somehow, but while that is being determined – help for those with ASD and eating disorders …
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Martin Bailey joins the conversation around patents, pro-level resolution, the ethics of licensing photojournalism images and what some might consider a dream job in Iceland for a month. All this and more, thanks for listening! Story 1: Canon patent application shows shutter-like barrier mechanism for protectin…
 
As you listen to this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, your phone will be struck by particles created by collisions of cosmic rays with atoms in the atmosphere. The vast majority of these particles have no effect on digital electronics, but very occasionally they can flip a bit. While this is usually harmless, it can have dire effects o…
 
This week we're talking about the endangered species act, how it works, and some examples of how the restoration act has worked for some species. Is the endangered species act effective? Listen in to find out what the research would suggest. For full show notes visit our website: sciencemanagementsymbiosis.com…
 
What is the single most measured thing in fire science? The answer is easy - temperature. We use it everywhere - from learning material properties in TGA's to expressing conditions in compartment fires. We use it at the same time to define exposure conditions for our structures and the acceptance criteria within them. We even use it in evacuation s…
 
In the lead-up to the athletics competitions at the Tokyo Olympic Games 2020, Shivani Dave takes look at how advances in running shoe technology are resulting in records being smashed. Talking to Geoff Burns, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Michigan who specialises in biomechanics, Shivani asks how so-called ‘super spikes’ work …
 
Cool News Timestamps: Scientists Created the World’s Toughest Self-Healing Material | Interesting Engineering (01:38) Tesla's “Self-Driving” Tech Available for $99/Month | MotorTrend (07:30) Microsoft-powered autonomous beach-cleaning robot | CNET (14:46) Jeff Bezos launches into space on Blue Origin's 1st astronaut flight | Space.com (19:26) First…
 
Have you ever wondered why some long-jumpers cycle their legs in the air after take-off, why the 400 m race can have no more than nine lanes, or what’s the optimal stride length that athletes should aim for between hurdles? With the Tokyo Olympics beginning this week, our reviews and careers editor Laura Hiscott has put together a physics-related q…
 
This week we're giving you an overview about the concept and pillars of restoration, some examples, and a discussion all about the management aspects of restoration. For full show notes visit our website: sciencemanagementsymbiosis.comPor SMS Podcast - Liana and Bryn
 
We learned in our previous episode about the very real consequences that extreme heat has on human health and wellbeing, but there is little research into what actually happens to our bodies when exposed to extreme heat apart from in the world of sports science. In the second part of our discussion, as fears mount that the Tokyo Olympics will be th…
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Allan Attridge joins the show to discuss how to grow your skills as a photographer, a new backup and digital asset manager from SmugMug, and how we would like a film-to-digital conversion take place. It’s always great to have Allan on the show, especially since we both just [...]…
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Allan Attridge joins the show to discuss how to grow your skills as a photographer, a new backup and digital asset manager from SmugMug, and how we would like a film-to-digital conversion take place. It’s always great to have Allan on the show, especially since we both just [...]…
 
Did you know that the standard temperature-time curve, which is the underpinning of the fire resistance of assemblies, is over 100 years old? Once you know that, you cannot stop but think about how this affects modern construction works. In this episode, I'm interviewing dr John Gales from York University, who has spent over a decade studying the h…
 
The Guardian’s global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, speaks to Shivani Dave about extreme weather events – including the extreme heat recently recorded in the US and Canada. In the first of two parts, we hear how extreme heat comes about and why extreme weather events such as floods and monsoons look set to become more likely and even more ext…
 
Cool News Timestamps Northrop to build homes on moon orbit under $935 mln NASA contract | Reuters (01:07) Tesla launches initiative to build first solar neighborhood in Austin | Fox7Austin (06:38) US Special Operations Command to Test Anti-Aging Pill | GenEngNews & Popular Mechanics (12:10) New Spring-Loaded 'Sound Screw' Makes Drywall Noise-Dampen…
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Steve Brazill joins to discuss new cameras small and gigantic, how nations should handle truth in imaging on social media, advancements in competition for Photoshop and what exactly a “lightograph” is. All this and more – thanks for listening! Preamble: if you have a copy of my new [...]…
 
On this episode of Photo Geek Weekly, Steve Brazill joins to discuss new cameras small and gigantic, how nations should handle truth in imaging on social media, advancements in competition for Photoshop and what exactly a “lightograph” is. All this and more – thanks for listening! Preamble: if you have a copy of my new [...]…
 
When the cosmologist Stephen Hawking published A Brief History of Time in 1988, he quickly became the world’s most famous physicist. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we talk to science writer Charles Seife about his new book, a biography of the late cosmologist entitled Hawking Hawking: the Selling of a Scientific Celebrity, in w…
 
Nearly all coronavirus restrictions in England are set to be lifted from Monday 19 July. But what are the risks of unlocking when we could be in the middle of a third wave of infections? The Guardian’s science editor, Ian Sample, talks to Anand Jagatia about how cases, hospital admissions and deaths are modelled to increase in the coming weeks, as …
 
Why do we take certain decisions during an evacuation process? How do we choose the evacuation route? These are often affected by cognitive biases, which is the main theme of today's episode. With Dr Michael Kinsey we will discuss how biases can be used to understand known behaviours and model human behaviour in a more realistic way. A lot of focus…
 
This week, Peter Simons provides an update on the FDA's controversial approval of Alzheimer's drug aducanumab, a new guideline for psychoeducation about ADHD, a study linking poverty rates and youth suicide, and an article providing essential information about antidepressant withdrawal. Federal Investigation into FDA Approval of Alzheimer’s Drug Gu…
 
Before Downing Street urged ‘ extreme caution’ around the lifting of restrictions on so-called ‘freedom day’, Shivani Dave spoke to Prof Stephen Reicher about how mixed messages surrounding restrictions can affect our behaviour Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/…
 
News Timestamps: Stumble-proof robot adapts to challenging terrain in real time | TechCrunch (01:33) Rare 'hypernova' explosion detected on fringes of the Milky Way for the first time | Space.com (07:35) New fabric passively cools whatever it’s covering—including you | Ars Technica (11:37) A Sunscreen for Pavement Could Help Keep Cities Cool | Gizm…
 
Children and infants who later go on to have an autism diagnosis show impairments in communication. Is there anything that parents can do? Yes! Talk. Talk in complicated sentences. Talk responsively and keep it up. This isn’t always an inherent skill, it’s learned, and in this podcast we talk about the biological basis of why infants with ASD are m…
 
Wearing a face mask is a part of daily life for many of us; but how much do we know about the physics behind how they work? In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Kai Liu at Georgetown University explains why a nanoporous metallic foam that he has developed could lead to masks that offer better protection from diseases such as COVID-1…
 
Fibromyalgia sufferer Vicky Naylor was successfully managing her condition – until she developed Covid-19. In the second part of our exploration of chronic pain, the Guardian science correspondent Linda Geddes tells Anand Jagatia what we know about the connection between chronic pain, Covid and mental health, and why it affects women more than men.…
 
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