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Edited by bestselling anthologist John Joseph Adams, LIGHTSPEED is a Hugo Award-winning, critically-acclaimed digital magazine. In its pages, you'll find science fiction from near-future stories and sociological SF to far-future, star-spanning SF. Plus there's fantasy from epic sword-and-sorcery and contemporary urban tales to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folk tales. Each month, LIGHTSPEED brings you a mix of originals and reprints featuring a variety of authors, from the bestseller ...
 
Whether you’re curious about getting healthy, the Big Bang or the science of cooking, find out everything you need to know in under 30 minutes with Instant Genius. The team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine talk to world-leading experts to bring you a bite-sized masterclass on a new subject each week. Then when you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius. Dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of scien ...
 
Topics on the science of psychotherapy and psychology hosted by the editors of The Science of Psychotherapy magazine. This podcast covers the neuroscience, neurobiology, biology, sociology, brain science, and even the quantum and metaphysical elements that affect our mental well being and how understanding these elements informs the psychotherapist and psychologist.
 
This podcast series is brought to you by the Science Communication and Magazine team of the Max Planck PhD network. We want to make the process of getting a doctorate more transparent and raise awareness about possible career opportunities for doctoral researchers inside and outside of science. We disseminate information to early career researchers. We also focus on problems in academia and discuss topics of Open Science and research assessment. Follow us on Twitter @MPPhdnetPodcast.
 
"It's Only Science" is a podcast from the editorial team at Discover Magazine. Every episode, we get the band of nerds together to talk about science. We might discuss the news, play some games or just share something that blew our minds recently. We don't take ourselves too seriously, so join us and have some fun. After all, it's only science.
 
The Undark Podcast continues our mission of illuminating the places where science intersects — and sometimes collides — with our everyday lives, in the form of audio documentaries released monthly from September to May. Scientific questions and challenges, after all, are woven deeply into our politics, our economics, our culture — and they are animated by a wide spectrum of competing values and interests. Our goal is to present rich, narrative-driven audio stories of science as it manifests ...
 
Let Science to Sage take you on a scientific and mystical journey where the sciences, spirituality, world philosophies, and ancient wisdom fuse. Explore with leading-edge scientists, innovative thinkers, mathematicians, mystics and artists from around the world. Your Host is Karen Elkins, Editor, Researcher and Designer of Science to Sage Magazine (com)
 
From archeology to zoology, real-world science is everywhere in Star Wars! Every episode includes an interview with an expert discussing how Star Wars relates to their field of study. Explore the many ways science is represented in a galaxy far, far away with hosts Melissa Miller and James Floyd, both freelance writers for Star Wars Insider magazine. Part of the Skywalking Network
 
G.L.Vandenburg wrote quirky and funny Science Fiction stories for Amazing Science Fiction Stories, and similar magazines in the 1950's. These four are a selection that give a good taste of his offbeat approach, strange sense of humor and relaxed narrative style that brought joy and excitement to those of us who bought these magazines and saw his name on the cover. In the first, Martian V.F.W., some strange visitors join a parade; in the second, Jubilation, U.S.A, our first visitors from oute ...
 
What if the cataclysmic Tunguska explosion of 1908 was caused, not by a meteor or a comet, but by a microscopic black hole? What if that fantastic object - smaller than an atom, older than the stars, heavier than a mountain - is still down there, orbiting deep inside the earth, slowly consuming the planet? What if only a rookie government agent and an uncannily-insightful consultant stand between a renegade Russian billionaire and his plans to use the black hole to change history - or end it ...
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine and his column, "Antigravity", is one of science writing's rate venues for humor. Check our the new daily podcast from Scientific American: "60-Second Science." To view all of our ...
 
Rish Outfield and Big Anklevich bring you short stories focusing on the Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror genres. Other genres will also be included, because The Dunesteef Audio Fiction Magazine simply want to bring you the best stories. So tune in and enjoy as these wonderful stories come flowing into your ears to fill your mind with wonder, joy, or dread.
 
Tom Swift is an inventor, and these are his adventures. The locale is the little town of Shopton in upstate New York, near Lake Carlopa. While some of Tom's inventions are not well-founded in a scientific sense, others elaborated developments in the news and in popular magazines aimed at young science and invention enthusiasts. Presenting themselves as a forecast of future possibilities, they now and then hit close to the mark. Some predicted inventions that came true include "photo telephon ...
 
Dr. Michio Kaku is the host of Science Fantastic. He also is one of the world's leading experts in theoretical physics, and according to New York Magazine, one of the “10 Smartest People in New York.” Listeners from all walks of life tune in to hear Dr. Kaku discuss today's hottest and most relevant scientific/cultural topics covering everything from black holes and parallel universes to hip, provocative discussions on philosophy and the latest technology.
 
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN) has retained its position as the premier biotech publication since its launch in 1981. GEN publishes a print edition monthly and has additional exclusive editorial content online, including news and analysis as well as webinars, videos, and polls. GEN's unique news and technology focus covers the entire bioproduct life cycle, including drug discovery, early-stage R&D, applied research (e.g., omics, biomarkers, and diagnostics), bioprocessing, an ...
 
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As King Isce’s invasion draws nearer, Joah, Misla, and Damien fly back to sunset with Prince Kal. They’re too late to warn their community, but can they defeat the conspirators who betrayed them before the sun leaves them behind forever? Narrated by host Matt Gomez. Published in Metaphorosis on 24 September 2021. Find the original at magazine.metap…
 
Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss fossilized footprints left on a lake shore in North America sometime before the end of Last Glacial Maximum—possibly the earliest evidence for humans on the continent. Read the research. Next, Paolo Cherubini, a senior scientist in the dendrosciences research group at the Swi…
 
When it begins to snow, it never stops. Perhaps not for you, but another iteration of you---a manifestation of your wild possibilities. I hope it’s not you, for my sake. When it begins to snow, the sky comes down in sharp, precise fragments, and you press your forehead against the window and think: don’t ever stop. And it doesn’t. I don’t want it t…
 
Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about plans for NASA’s first visit to the Moon in 50 years—and the quick succession of missions that will likely follow. Next, Eileen Roesler, an engineering psychologist at the Technical University of Berlin, discusses the benefits of making robots that look and act like people—it’s not always …
 
These baby greater sac-winged bats babble to learn their mating songs Like human infants, the young bats sing protosyllables until they master their vocalizations Greater sac-winged bat pups, like this one in Costa Rica, learn the rich vocal repertoire of adults by babbling, similar to human infants, a new study suggests.…
 
New studies hint that the coronavirus may be evolving to become more airborne The virus appears to spread through the air, but masks reduce the amount of infectious virus A researcher demonstrates the use of a device that captures fine aerosols and large droplets in a person's breath exhaled while breathing, talking and singing.…
 
Frog and toad pupils mainly come in seven different shapes Analyzing over 3,200 species revealed diamonds, fans and more The pupil shapes of frogs ( Hyloscirtus tigrinus , shown) and toads generally didn't correspond with particular habitats or habits.
 
A well-known wildflower turns out to be a secret carnivore Triantha occidentalis sets a deathtrap for small insects just beneath its flower This wildflower, Triantha occidentalis , growing in Cypress Provincial Park in British Columbia, Canada, has sticky hairs on its stem that it uses to trap and digest small insects.…
 
Ghost games' spotlight the psychological effect fans have on referees With stands empty, European soccer teams playing at home receive more foul calls Two German soccer clubs play in an empty stadium on May 16, 2020 due to pandemic restrictions.
 
An incredibly resilient coral in the Great Barrier Reef offers hope for the future The reef's widest coral has survived for hundreds of years and weathered many bleaching events Researchers swim over the 10.4-meter-wide Muga dhambi, the widest known coral in the Great Barrier Reef.
 
A giant tortoise was caught stalking, killing and eating a baby bird New video shows that the lumbering reptiles really are cold-blooded A Seychelles giant tortoise lunges towards a noddy tern chick in the first documented instance of a tortoise hunting.
 
Here's how cool a star can be and still achieve lasting success The motions of nearby stars reveal the boundary between red dwarfs and brown dwarfs Brown dwarfs (one illustrated) glow dimly from the heat of their formation but have too little mass to sustain nuclear reactions.
 
This big-headed pterosaur may have preferred walking over flying A long neck and an oversize noggin mostly grounded one ancient reptile, fossil suggests This reconstruction shows Tupandactylus navigans , a type of pterosaur with a large crest on the top of its head.
 
NASA's Perseverance rover snagged its first Martian rock samples The rock bits are the first from Mars slated to eventually return to Earth The Perseverance rover drilled two cylinders of stone out of a Martian rock called Rochette in early September.
 
The new UN climate change report shows there's no time for denial or delay Extreme weather events linked to changing climate are already found everywhere around the globe Torrential rains flooded Xinxiang in China's Henan province in mid-July 2021, leading to dramatic rescues like this one.
 
A supernova's delayed reappearance could pin down how fast the universe expands The catch: We have to wait until about 2037 for an answer This cluster of galaxies, seen in a Hubble telescope image, contorts the light of a galaxy far behind it into arcs (orange).
 
With a powerful laser blast, scientists near a nuclear fusion milestone A National Ignition Facility experiment produced a record 1.3 million joules of fusion energy Scientists at the National Ignition Facility have produced record-breaking energy in a nuclear fusion experiment.
 
Satellite swarms may outshine the night sky's natural constellations Mega-constellations from those satellites will be visible to the naked eye, simulations suggest Artificial satellites like SpaceX's Starlink constellations will leave streaks in photos of the sky taken by researchers and amateur astronomers alike.…
 
Jupiter's intense auroras superheat its upper atmosphere Heat spawned by high-speed charged particles slamming into the air above the poles spreads far Jupiter's magnetic field lines (blue) steer charged particles in the solar wind toward the planet's poles, generating auroras (white) similar to Earth's.…
 
Ice Rivers' invites you to get to know our world's melting glaciers A scientist's memoir mixes personal recollections about fieldwork with a dash of science and history Glaciologist Jemma Wadham has studied glaciers all over the world, including Pastoruri Glacier (shown in 2010) in the Peruvian Andes.…
 
50 years ago, chemical pollutants were linked to odd animal behavior Excerpt from the September 18, 1971 issue of Science News Chemical pollutants can disrupt aquatic creatures' delicate sense of smell, scientists have found.
 
Australian fires in 20192020 had even more global reach than previously thought Blazes dumped a vast amount of CO 2 into the air and triggered faraway algae blooms in the ocean Smoke rises from burning trees near the town of Nowra, in Australia's New South Wales, on December 31, 2019.
 
One of nature's key constants is much larger in a quantum material The fine-structure constant is 10 times its normal value in the material, giving a peek at an alternate universe Particles with the quantum property called spin, illustrated by the blue arrow, can't agree on an orientation in a type of material called quantum spin ice.…
 
Scientists have a new word for birds stealing animal hair Species that engage in 'kleptotrichy' may use their loot to deter predators This black-crested titmouse ( Baeolophus atricristatus ) was caught on video in Texas plucking hair from a sleeping fox to build a nest.
 
Whirling maple seeds inspired these tiny flying sensors Objects as small as a sand grain could be dispersed by air to monitor environmental conditions Scientists created minuscule microfliers in a variety of shapes (shown) that glide through the air similar to maple tree seeds.
 
DNA offers a new look at how Polynesia was settled Voyagers migrated to islands sprinkled across a large area of the Pacific within about 500 years Eastern Polynesia's settlers rapidly voyaged across a vast area starting nearly 1,200 years ago, a new genetic study finds.
 
Bloodthirsty vampire bats like to drink with friends over strangers Social bonds extend beyond the roost and may save time and energy when hunting Common vampire bats ( Desmodus rotundus ) form social bonds at the roost through sharing food and grooming.
 
Ghost tracks' suggest people came to the Americas earlier than once thought If confirmed, newly described footprints could help rewrite textbooks These human footprints from what's now New Mexico may be between 23,000 and 21,000 years old.
 
50 years ago, scientists found a link between aspirin use and pregnancy complications Excerpt from the October 2, 1971 issue of Science News Even now, 50 years after the first evidence that aspirin could be harmful for fetal development, parents struggle to find clear guidance for taking aspirin during pregnancy.…
 
How extreme heat from climate change distorts human behavior As temperatures rise, violence and aggression also go up while focus and productivity decline Intense heat can affect human behavior, from making it hard to focus to prompting aggression.
 
This is the oldest fossil evidence of spider moms taking care of their young A 99-million-year-old spider trapped in amber sheds light on ancient arachnid parenting A female spider trapped in amber alongside her egg sac, seen here from above (left) and below (right), is the oldest evidence of maternal care in spiders.…
 
An Indigenous people in the Philippines have the most Denisovan DNA Indigenous Ayta Magbukon people get 5 percent of their DNA from the mysterious ancient hominids Ayta people in the Philippines, shown here, belong to a group of ethnic communities that includes one with the highest level of Denisovan ancestry in the world, a new study finds.…
 
Ripples in rats' brains tied to memory may also reduce sugar levels The results suggest brain cell activity could play a surprising role in the body's metabolism Bursts of activity created by nerve cells in the hippocampus (computer drawing shown), called sharp-wave ripples, are thought to solidify memories.…
 
How different COVID-19 testing plans can help keep kids safe in school Multiple strategies, each with benefits and challenges, now exist to support in-person learning Coronavirus tests, whether done with a saliva sample or a nasal swab, are one tool schools can use to monitor and prevent COVID-19 outbreaks this year.…
 
The Top 10 scientific surprises of Science News' first 100 years Antimatter, dark energy, plate tectonics and the role of DNA were unexpected discoveries By Tom Siegfried Contributing Correspondent
 
A hammerhead shark baby boom near Florida hints at a historic nursery The nursery of endangered sharks would be the first known in U.S. Atlantic waters A researcher releases a tagged baby great hammerhead shark into the water just off the coast of Miami.
 
This moon-sized white dwarf is the smallest ever found The dead star is also spinning extremely fast and has a powerful magnetic field With a radius of about 2,100 kilometers, a newfound white dwarf (left in this illustration) is just slightly bigger than the moon (right).
 
A 1,000-year-old grave may have held a powerful nonbinary person The remains were previously thought to be a respected woman who might have been a warrior An early medieval grave in Finland may have contained the remains of a respected individual (illustrated) who didn't fit social expectations at the time about how to be either strictly masculine …
 
Windbreaks, surprisingly, could help wind farms boost power output Low walls in front of turbines could improve performance by 10 percent, simulations show Windbreaks could help wind farms pump out more power.
 
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